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Zombi Child Brings Welcome Authenticity, Little Else

Bertrand Bonello (Saint Laurent) returns with Zombi Child, a socio-political treatise disguised as a horror film. (In fact, there’s hardly any “horror” at all.) However, the film bites of more than it can chew. By juggling too many themes—ranging from teenage angst and French Colonialism to identity politics and racism—the film feels strung together to impart some broad message that becomes lost in the telling.

Merger Creates Killer Business in New Short PANIC FEST 2020

Merger cashes in on the deadly potential of the phrase, “It’s just business.” A throwback to aesthetic of retro medical thrillers, the film follows a company researcher named Kevin (Sasha Andreev) who suspects his co-worker Andy (Ryan Sandberg) of shady business dealings. When he sneaks into Andy’s hotel room to search for clues, he finds himself trapped in the closet when Any returns, leading to a deadly confrontation.

Mateo Delivers Pensive Zombie in 3 Minutes - PANIC FEST 2020

A zombie turns philosopher in Mateo, a thought-provoking horror short from Mexico. Directed by Fernando Perezgil, the story unfolds five years after an apocalypse has ravaged the earth. Despite being turned into a zombie, a former self-service store employee named Mateo (Waldo Facco) miraculously retains consciousness. His thoughts are heard in a subtitled voice-over as he wanders the land. An interesting theme Perezgil weaves into the story is that of humankind’s destructive appetite in relati

Hello Offers Plenty to Enjoy in Abstract Horror

As an independent filmmaker working in horror, there are many ways in which a director can create atmosphere and tension with inventive editing and camerawork. In Hello, director Nikhail Asnani creates an abstract piece that uses loops of the central character’s voice (speaking “Hello” in different languages) to set the mood for the piece. It sure has a Beatles’ “Revolution 9” feel with the way the repetition affects the viewer.

BACURAU an Exercise in Sustained Tension

Director Kleber Mendonça Filho’s (Aquarias) latest film (co-directed with Juliano Dornellos) is a meditation on the socio-political state in Brazil, the importance of community, and the effects of violence. Shortlisted for Brazil’s official entry for best foreign language film for the 2020 Academy Awards, Bacurau has garnered acclaim from audiences and critics alike since its premiere at Cannes, where it tied for a Jury Prize.

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The Panther Online (Chapman University)

The Point / Loma Beat (Formerly The Point Weekly, Point Loma Nazarene University)

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